Art and culture 

The Roman town of Cáparra

Caparrá, which has uncertain origins, became a Roman municipium under Emperor Vespasian. The town's growth was propelled by its privileged position along the Silver Way

Come and explore unique Roman ruins in the Peninsula


Location and Contact:

A-66 motorway. Junction 455 towards Guijo de Granadilla - CC-13.3 (B-road). About 5 kilometres from the A-66
10667 Oliva de Plasencia , Cáceres (Extremadura)
Opening times

WINTER (1 October to 31 May)

Tuesday-Sunday and public holidays, 10am-2pm and 4-7pm.

SUMMER (1 June to 30 September)

Tuesday-Sunday and public holidays, 10am-2pm and 5-8pm.

Closed on Sunday afternoons and Mondays.

Fee

Free admission.

  • Caparrá, which has uncertain origins, became a Roman municipium under Emperor Vespasian. The town's growth was propelled by its privileged position along the Silver Way

    The intriguing site of Cáparra lies a few kilometres out of Plasencia, in the municipality of Oliva de Plasencia, within the Caceres region. Under Roman rule, this city would become an important communications hub along the north-south axis between Emérita Augusta (Merida) and Artúrica Augusta (Astorga), which forms the Silver Way. Its strategic position guaranteed its preferential treatment amongst the Roman municipia of Lusitania, fuelling its growth and the gradual building of monuments, which are now evident in the archaeological remains.

    Cáparra was totally fortified, and had three gates, positioned in the south-east, east and west. There were two main thoroughfares in the city, the cardo and the decumano. The latter ran along the Silver Way as it ran through the town, and its far ends ran from the Eastern to the Western gates.

    You can visit the site, using an itinerary which begins at the visitors' centre, in one of the three necropolis buildings which have been discovered to date. Afterwards, the route will take you to the remains of the amphitheatre and the South-West Gate.

    In the centre of the site lies the Cáparra arch. This arch, which is the undisputed symbol of the city, dates from 100 A.D. and has four arches which are sustained by four pillars, creating a four-fronted arch structure which is unique in the Iberian Peninsula.

    The arch opens out on to the forum, an open space which was the town's political and religious centre. In it you can still see the remains of the main buildings: the basilica, the papal curia and another three temples.

    Next to the arch and the forum are the hot springs, also at the foot of the two main thoroughfares. Here you can see the hot water piping system, the exercise ring, and the shops or tabernae, adjacent to the building and open to the decumano.

    The decumano is also of interest as here you will still be able to see the paving of the Silver Way, which also included the line of porticos on both sides of it, and the other facades of several Roman domus

  • Origin:
  • 1st century
  • Construction:
  • Amphitheatre
  • Arch
  • Road
  • City / Settlement / Excavations
  • Door
  • Walled enclosure
  • Ruins
  • Thermal baths
  • Archaeological site
  • Art period:
  • Roman
  • Period in history:
  • 1st century
  • Official name :
  • Property of Cultural Interest
  • Accessibility:

    • Disabled access
    • Admits guide dogs
    • Accessible car park
    • Toilet for disabled people in common areas

Gallery:

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